Nail your responsive layouts with this device cheat sheet

Ensure your layouts scale across devices and resolutions with this handy reference.

No-one ever said that responsive web design was easy, but there's plenty that you can do to smooth out the process. If you can go into a responsive project without having to worry about the size of your grids then that'll save you at least one headache along the way.

Here is a quick breakdown of the standard measurements you can use across devices, depending on the width you choose to make the columns. Remember, the column widths should remain the same across device sizes, but you can adjust the initial width to fit your needs. I'll typically design a mobile website at 360px wide to work in this system.

120px-wide columns

Television

1,024 x 576 (1080p aspect ratio): 8 columns, 32px margin

Desktop

1,440 x 840: 12 columns, 0px margin
1,280 x 800: 10 columns, 40px margin left and right

Tablet

1,024 x 768: 8 columns, 32px margin left and right
960 x – : 8 columns, 0px margin

Mobile

320 x – : 3 columns, 0px margin

100px-wide columns

Television

1,024 x 576 (1080p ratio): 10 columns, 12px margin left and right

Desktop

1,440 x 840: 14 columns, 20px margin left and right
1,280 x 800: 12 columns, 40px margin left and right

Tablet

1,024 x 768: 10 columns, 12px margin left and right
960 x – : 9 columns, 30px margin left and right

Mobile

320 x – : 3 columns, 10px margin left and right

80px-wide columns

Television

1,024 x 576 (1080p ratio): 12 columns, 32px margin left and right

Desktop

1,440 x 840: 18 columns, 0px margin
1,280 x 800: 16 columns, 0px margin

Tablet

1,024 x 768: 12 columns, 32px margin left and right
960 x – : 12 columns, 0px margin

Mobile

320 x – : 4 columns, 0px margin

This article originally appeared in net magazine issue 281; buy it here!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marc Anderson is an associate design director at Fantasy. His areas of expertise are art direction, design, and UX.