Circular 17: typography magazine lets the pictures speak for themselves

Domenic Lippa's team finally achieve its dream: to produce a typography magazine with no editorial typography inside

Circular 17 is an ambition achieved for Domenic Lippa and his team at Pentagram. They've wanted to eliminate typography from the magazine since they started designing it nine months ago, so enabling the work inside to speak for itself.

Circular 17 magazine cover and slipcase

Circular 17 magazine cover and slipcase

Content clues

Even the cover of Circular 17 magazine gives no clue as to its contents, its title, or its issue number come to that. All you see is pure magenta and a luminous silver circle on the front.

The problem with not including any editorial typography, of course, is that you still have to get across information about the magazine's content to your readers in some way.

Domenic Lippa and his team achieved this by including it on Circular 17's slipcase instead, along with thumbnails of each spread on the magazine's back cover to aid navigation.

Circular 17 magazine cover showing 8 different colourways

Circular 17 magazine cover showing 8 different colourways

A limited edition of seven additional colourways were also produced, printed on a range of different paper stocks.

Circular 17 magazine Quadrophenia spread

Circular 17 magazine Quadrophenia spread

The Typographic Circle was formed in 1976 is aimed at anyone who is interested in type or typography. Individual memberships cost £30 per year with corporate and student memberships available for £125 p.a. and £15 p.a. respectively.

For more info on type terms, check out the What is Typography post on our sister site Creative Bloq.