Image of the day: Works That Work by Peter Biľak

We catch up with Peter Biľak to find out more about his new project, Works That Work

"A magazine of unexpected creativity." That's how Typotheque's Peter Biak describes the first issue of Works That Work – a publication dedicated to exploring "various manifestations of human creativity."

The project began with a crowdfunding campaign to see whether or not there was space in the market for the title. The answer was a resounding yes. By the time the mag was published, over a thousand readers and advertisers pledged in excess of €30.000 – enough to cover the costs of the first issue.

"One of the fundamental assertions of Works That Work," Biak says, "is that creativity is not the exclusive domain of artists or designers, but something that surrounds us in our daily lives, something so embedded in our everyday experience that it often escapes our attention."

Essays on graphic design, urban design and business organisation; photo essays about refugee camp gardens, army chefs and improvised furniture; an interview with translator and editor Linda Asher and a complete one-act play by David Ives: the first issues is as diverse as it is brilliant, with the magazine to be published every six months in print and digital editions.

The print version will be circulated both by post and using a ‘social distribution’ network that rewards readers with a share in its profits.

"Works That Work is a magazine for the curious mind," Biak add, "endeavouring to surprise its readers with a rich mix of diverse subjects connected by the theme of human creativity, searching for a deeper understanding of work and its motives.

"We started Works That Work because we ourselves are fascinated by how, why and what people create. We don’t know where this project will lead us, but we are very much looking forward to the trip."

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