Learn why this Italian studio has expanded into London

After a successful three years in Milan, motion graphics studio FullScream's search for fresh talent has led it to London.

Creative director Ced Pakusevskij (right) and fashion director Elisabetta Giovi are helping launch FullScream's new London office

Since it launched in Milan three years ago, boutique motion graphics studio FullScream has been busy making waves in the luxury, fashion and TV markets. With an impressive bank of clients including Roberto Cavalli, MTV, Swarovski, Sky and X Factor under its belt, FullScream decided to look for a new challenge. Hoping to build on its success in Italy, it expanded overseas to London, drawn by the promise of fresh designer talent, a boundary-pushing creative scene and plenty of British wit. We caught up with the studio's creative director Ced Pakusevskij and fashion director Elisabetta Giovi to find out more.

What attracted you to the design scene in London in particular?

Ced Pakusevskij: London is the creative capital of Europe. The best talent and the best work. Our international clients kept nudging us to open here, and so it became part of FullScream's plans for growth. We love London for how everyone pushes the boundaries in design, and we're excited now to be a part of it.

Have you done any interesting projects since you've moved over here?

CP: Sky Cinema asked us to rebrand one of its TV channels, Sky Cinema Oscar. This was a really cool project because our creative combined both the history and future of film into one. We made a city based on what Tokyo would look like in 2025, with the recognisable West End of New York from the '40s – a retro-future.

Have some of the team moved across to London, or have you brought in a completely new group of creatives in the UK?

Elisabetta Giovi: A bit of both. We have a new team in our office at Charing Cross Road, but there's always a flow between Milan and London. It's a lot of fun for us as we get to explore and meet new people. FullScream's work has been well received and everyone's so nice.

How are you settling in? Is there a difference in how Brits approach things compared to Italians?

EG: We shouldn't admit this, but we have, on occasion, been outwitted by the British dry sense of humour. We've committed to catching up by using a pun in every meeting. Failure revokes the right to use our complimentary office umbrellas. For some reason, nobody dares break the rule in London.

What are your plans for the London office, moving forward?

CP: Apart from buying an espresso machine, our plan is to recruit some of London's best design talent and create a lasting agency with work we can be proud of.

This article originally appeared in Computer Arts issue 228.