Innovative architect creates cardboard cathedral and other mindblowing buildings

Designs built with everyday materials help those affected by natural disasters.

There are many famous buildings in the world worth seeing. But none are quite like the ones created by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. Not only does each look astonishing, they all have an equally incredible story behind them. Using everyday materials such as paper tubes, packaging design materials and shipping containers, Ban has spent much of his career creating stunning architectural designs for those in need.

Among his creations is a beautiful cardboard cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand, designed by Ban following the 2011 earthquake which claimed 185 lives. And a row of paper log houses, designed as temporary accommodation following the Kobe earthquake in 1995.

Among Ban's creations is a beautiful cardboard cathedral in New Zealand

Outstanding contribution

It's this contribution to both humanity and the design world, with his innovative use of everyday materials, that recently lead him to win the prestigious Pritzker Architect Prize 2014.

Ban designed these paper log houses, used as temporary accommodation following the Kobe earthquake in 1995

The Pritzker Architect Prize jury citation states: "Shigeru Ban, the 2014 laureate, reflects this spirit of the prize to the fullest. He is an outstanding architect who, for 20 years, has been responding with creativity and high quality design to extreme situations caused by devastating natural disasters.

"His buildings provide shelter, community centers, and spiritual places for those who have suffered tremendous loss and destruction. When tragedy strikes, he is often there from the beginning, as in Rwanda, Turkey, India, China, Italy, and Haiti, and his home country of Japan, among others."

Have you seen any inspirational architecture recently? Let us know in the comments.


Kerrie Hughes is associate editor at Creative Bloq. Her employment at Future Publishing began in January 2010 as staff writer for 3D World magazine. Since then, she's written regularly for other publications, including ImagineFX and Computer Arts magazines.