WATCH THIS! The 'making of' LWLies issue 42

Independent movie magazine Little White Lies has released this inspiring 'making of' video, showcasing their incredible design abilities. Check it out!

Little White Lies magazine started in 2005 and have been making leaps and bounds ever since. With its ethos of 'truth and movies,' many movie fans have taken to the magazine not just for it's content but for its incredible design.

The team at creative agency The Church of London have made it their mission to produce beautiful, design led magazines that will showcase new and emerging talent. Little White Lies regularly hold creative brief competitions as well as exhibitions of the entries. You can take a look at their Plati-scene winners as well as the D&AD Student Award winners.

In this video, you can see Paul Willoughby and his team at work for the magazine's latest edition 'The Lawless issue'. The entire issue's design, from the cover to the introduction pages, was hand-carved from Japanese plywood. You can instantly see the passion the team at The Church of London have for the print industry and we couldn't be more impressed.

A word from the team at LWLies

Little White Lies' creative director Paul Willoughby and editor Matt Bochenski took time out of their busy schedule to talk to us about the purpose of the magazine and the importance of its physicality.

"The design ethos for every issue of LWLies is inspired by the cover
film, in this case John Hillcoat's 1920s-set bootlegging drama,
Lawless. The characters in the film inhabit a backwoods world in the
mountains of Virginia. It's almost a land that time forgot, a place
grappling with the idea of modernity, underpinned by folklore and
myth. The principal characters, the Bondurant brothers, are
deep-rooted, atavistic symbols of this forgotten past; men of action
rather than words.

"As a response to these semi-mythical figures I wanted to explore
primitive art processes connected with the era and with the natural
elements of the landscape, including the huge rolling forests that carpet the county. That made wood the obvious material to work with. The decision to hand-carve the images out of Japanese plywood was an aesthetic one, but the physical action itself was important. It was an exercise in suffering: splinters, blisters, cuts, strains.

"That physicality is important to us. All magazines are beginning to
think about what it means to exist digitally, and LWLies is no
different. We're branching out into new platforms and embracing new technologies. But at the same time, we passionately believe in the
future of print, so we'll continue to push the boundaries of what's
possible. You're going to see us experimenting and innovating with the print version of LWLies: embracing its physical nature and literally pouring our sweat into the process of creating it.
"

For more information on Little White Lies or to buy The Lawless issue, visit the Little White Lies website.