New talent: University of the Arts London degree shows 2016

Our pick of 12 outstanding graduates from Central Saint Martins, Chelsea College of Art and London College of Communication this year.

If you're looking for the best new graduates for your studio or agency, don't miss Computer Arts' New Talent special, issue 256, featuring the team's handpicked selection of the UK's best graduates – on sale 22 July 2016.

As Europe's largest specialist art and design university, and ranked in the top five in the world, University of the Arts London (UAL) is always an absolute treat to visit during graduate show season.

Incorporating Central Saint Martins (CSM), London College of Communication (LCC), Chelsea College of Art, Camberwell College of Art, London College of Fashion and Wimbledon College of Art, UAL is spread all across the capital.

This year, we spent a inspiring weekend visiting the final-year shows at CSM, LCC and Chelsea to bring you our picks of the best new design and illustration talent.

Agnese Taurina

Agnese Taurina

Part of Agnese Taurina's Nature/Culture print series
  • College: Central Saint Martins
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: Nature/Culture

Agnese Taurina's Nature/Culture print series explores our relationship to nature. "The advance of technology has allowed humans to dominate nature, at the same time creating nostalgic ongoing," she argues.

"I have always been quite interested in utopias and potential realities instead of those that are already manifested," Taurina continues. "In this project, I have created utopian situations in which I analyse states of mind such as contemplation, pleasure, trance and ecstasy."

Agnese Taurina

Taurina's final pieces were screenprinted for extra depth and texture

Taurina was inspired by a visit to the V&A museum, and drew on shapes and patterns in sculptures, fabric prints and other objects on display. Her style involves blending hand-drawn with digital, and the final pieces were screenprinted for added depth and texture.

Alice Caiado

Alice Caiado

Extracts from The Book of Worries, by Alice Caiado
  • College: Central Saint Martins
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: The Book of Worries

Driven by her own experience of anxiety and the general pressure on young people to be successful, beautiful, sociable and multi-talented all at once, Alice Caiado developed The Book of Worries to delve into what preoccupies other people.

"A few months before graduating, I reached my peak of distress and started to worry about the smallest of things," she confesses. "These fears were paralysing me."

Caiado surveyed over 100 people about their worries, yielding over 500 responses and a rich tapestry of different worries: "From the deeply existential, to the banal, funny, and absurd."

While The Book of Worries has plenty of wit and humour inside, for Caiado it's also about giving people comfort, and showing worriers that they are not alone.

Amy Wallace

Amy Wallace

Amy Wallace worked with red and black inks in her lino-printed Fairytales project, to evoke the violent content
  • College: London College of Communication
  • Course: BA (Hons) Illustration and Visual Media
  • Project: Fairytale series

Based on the hidden violent and sexual connotations in common fairytales, Amy Wallace's final-year project reveals the history of Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and Cinderella.

"The violent content of these fairytales has been lost, and I wanted to echo the blood-curdling violence recorded since the 16th century in my illustrations," she explains.

Three of the episodes she depicts are the Huntsman being ordered to remove Snow White's lungs and liver; Snow White sleeping with each of her seven dwarves in succession, every hour; and the evil Queen's painful death as she's forced to dance in 'red hot' iron shoes.

Eliza Loh

Eliza Loh

Eliza Loh's Doodlelogy project provides a psychological analysis of the humble doodle
  • College: Central Saint Martins
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: Doodlelogy

Inspired by the book Everybody's Pixellated by Russell M. Arundel, Eliza Loh's Doodlelogy project explores the humble doodle through graphology (the study of handwriting) and psychoanalysis.

"The definition of doodling is given as 'the draw pictures of patterns while thinking about something else' - this absentmindedness makes them unconsciously revealing," believes Loh.

Her Doodlelogy Kit uses doodles to analyse interview candidates, and provides two posters to identity both positive traits, and less desirable attributes.

Eliza Loh

How Loh envisages different people's unconscious minds would look like interacting

The second part of Loh's project (above) imagines these abstract forms interacting with each other, as if different people's unconscious minds were having a conversation.

Freya Morgan

Freya Morgan

Each of Freya Morgan's If People Were Like Plants illustrations are reproduced as six-layer screenprints
  • College: Central Saint Martins
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
  • Project: If People Were Like Plants

Freya Morgan's fascination with plants stems from her childhood, when she first discovered "the uplifting feel of bringing something living from the outside world into the static indoor environment".

Her own collection grew rapidly, although after many of them died she began to question why we never feel bad about causing the death of these particular living organisms, compared to humans or animals.

If People Were Like Plants swaps the roles of human and houseplant in familiar domestic scenarios, to redress the balance between species. "They are not purely aesthetic objects: you have a relationship," insists Morgan. "You provide your plant with nourishment, and it provides you with the pleasure of seeing it flourish and grow."

Jieun Lee

Jieun Lee

Jieun Lee
  • College: Chelsea College of Art
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design Communication
  • Project: The Process Machine

Fascinated by the creative outcomes that can be achieved via chance operations, Jieun Lee developed The Process Machine to turn digital and analogue inputs into graphic visuals.

Jieun Lee

One of 15 riso prints created as part of Jieun Lee's The Process Machine project

"There are four steps for the audience," she explains. "While the audience can freely control the layout, the size and the number of shapes, their position is assigned completely randomly."

Joanna Haskins

Joanna Haskins

Joanna Haskins created a photographic still life to explore the little-known origins of pigments
  • College: Chelsea College of Art
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design Communication
  • Project: The Origin of Pigment

Joanna Haskins' final-year project The Origin of Pigment explores the fascinating stories behind the colours we take for granted. While her research yielded huge amounts of information, it was all hidden away in obtuse academic databases rather than celebrated visually.

Haskins' project centres on a huge A0 print of a photographic still life, depicting the stories of nine different pigments – each one explained through a series of postcards.

"The jug of yellow liquid tells how Indian Yellow was originally made from the dried urine of cows fed on mango leaves; the smoky skull is about how Bone White was made from the calcination of lambs bones," she explains.

Joanna Haskins

The reverse of the postcards explains the stories behind each colour

"It was a challenge to source these strange props, like the dried cochineal insects for the production of red pigment Carmine," she adds. "I wanted the photograph to be large, so the stories behind the colour demanded as much respect as a painting."

Joey Lim

Joey Lim

Joey Lim's Grayi project is an experimental new geometric approach to type design
  • College: London College of Communication
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design
  • Project: Grayi Type Kit

It was while researching a thesis that type design could never be truly original – since it's based on the same 26 letterforms and 10 numerals – that Joey Lim proved herself wrong.

"Grayi is an antithesis of my own writing," she explains. "It is an experimental geometric type system that explores the relationship between the forms and counterforms of the latin alphabet, and the possibility of creating a new alphabet, or a new language."

Joey Lim

Lim also developed a 3D type kit to make it easy to explore new geometric type forms

Grayi started as a hand-drawn typeface, which was then digitalised into a working font. Next, Lim again worked by hand, first by cutting and moving paper shapes and finally by assembling laser-cut acrylic components into a physical type kit, pictured above.

Kegan Greenfield

Kegan Greenfield

Kegan Greenfield's project provides a level playing field for visually impaired children to learn
  • College: Chelsea College of Art
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design Communication
  • Project: Moon Two / Better Together

In response to a D&AD New Blood brief from Monotype, Kegan Greenfield's revived William Moon's typeface Moon, and combined it with a custom Latin script to help children with visual impairments learn alongside those with normal sight.

"Moon Two is a hybrid typeface that stays true to the 171-year-old original in many ways, but removes the confusion that many children felt with its original rotated and mirrored shapes," he explains.

"This revival uses both squared and rounded terminals which aid tactile legibility by clearly signifying the beginning and end of character shapes as you read from left to right."

Kegan Greenfield

All 26 characters in Greenfield's Moon Two typeface are turned into stamps as part of the campaign

His campaign to promote the Moon Two typeface is called Better Together, symbolising the combination of character sets as well as the inclusive opportunies for education.

Greenfield's attention to detail doesn't stop there. "Tools such as flashcards will help younger readers learn to recognise objects, and the cards will be available in different coloured sets to suit different children's eyesight," he explains.

Lucy Bourton

Lucy Bourton

Lucy Bourton's This Must Be The Place gives a personal tour of London's music venues
  • College: Chelsea College of Art
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design Communication
  • Project: This Must Be The Place

Based around a collection of maps of 11 London boroughs, Lucy Bourton's This Must Be The Place uses personal "musical memories" to give an evocative guided tour of the capital.

Contributors include musicians, record labels, tour managers, journalists, record shop workers and artists. "Each person was asked to recall a memorable show they've attended, or an album that encapsulates the sound of living in London," she reveals.

Lucy Bourton

Kensington & Chelsea, one of 11 London boroughs covered in Bourton's project

Bourton's serif title typeface, Marker, was designed by Chelsea alumnus Ben Greehy. She opted for bold black text on bright coloured backgrounds as a homage to punk fanzines and record sleeves: "They were created relatively cheaply, but are still incredibly eye catching," she points out.

Natalie Itinov

Natalie Itinov

Paper Is Alive, by Natalie Itinov - a response to the fact that paper is much misunderstood
  • College: London College of Communication
  • Course: BA (Hons) Illustration and Visual Media
  • Project: Paper Is Alive

Inspired by her love of paper, Natalie Itinov developed her Paper Is Alive project in response to the fact that the material is widely used, but at the same time underestimated.

"My idea was to visualise paper as a fictional organism that is alive and capable of growing and transforming," she reveals. "I conducted visual and theoretical research on paper production, as well as plants, trees, annual circles, wood cells, mimicry and biomimetics."

Natalie Itinov

Made entirely from recycled brown paper, Paper Is Alive evokes a living organism

Itinov's final piece is made entirely from brown recycled paper: "The organism has grown and evolved around a crunched ball of paper that was thrown away (to die)," she explains. "It carries the message that paper is a living thing that should be treated and respected as such."

Sayeed Islam

Sayeed Islam

Sayeed Islam was influenced by Bruno Munari, Karel Martens and Karl Gerstner for his Modular Motion project
  • College: London College of Communication
  • Course: BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design
  • Project: Modular Motion

Taking inspiration from dot-matrix LED displays, halftone patterns and modular type, Sayeed Islam's Modular Motion is the culmination of his research into image-making processes.

Islam explored how pixels can translate the qualities of print onto something that would otherwise be stuck behind a screen.

Sayeed Islam

This simple animatic demonstrates how Modular Motion works

"Initially I experimented with flip books, but found them too limiting, so explored how I could introduce those sensory qualities found in print to an animation," he adds.

"The outcome combines animation with a physical set of three acrylic grids, bringing a physical quality to something that would otherwise be something to just view rather than experience," he explains.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nick Carson is editor of Computer Arts magazine.