Review: Star Wars The Force Awakens Incredible Cross-Sections

Vehicles, starships and a certain piece of junk from the latest Star Wars film are revealed in all their intricate glory

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Our Verdict

For fans, this book is sure to be the sort of intricate dose of artwork that will satisfy their thirst for all things Star Wars. However the slim volume might feel slightly lacking for those looking for more of an artistic insight.

Even people who have seen the latest Star Wars film multiple times may not realise quite how intricate and carefully thought out each vehicle and spaceship design really was. This book will set them straight.

Star Wars The Force Awakens Incredible Cross-Sections

Iconic spaceships like the famous X-wings get the cross-section treatement

It delivers exactly what the title promises: detailed cross-sections of 12 vehicles featured in the film, laid out across a series of stunning double-page spreads.

Star Wars The Force Awakens Incredible Cross-Sections

Take a peak inside the workings of a First Order TIE Fighter.

Including everything from Rey's speeder to the First Order's TIE Fighter and the Resistance X-Wing, as well as the Millennium Falcon, these illustrations let you examine minute details such as deflector shields, communications antenna and blaster cannons to your heart's content.

Star Wars The Force Awakens Incredible Cross-Sections

The book is a treasure trove of detail for Star Wars fans

Be warned, though: at just 47 pages, this is a slim volume. And while it takes a comprehensive approach to its subject matter, it doesn't feature any behind-the-scenes detail of how these designs were created by artists. In short, this book is aimed at fans not artists, so only buy this if you're the former as well as the latter.

The Verdict

7

out of 10

Star Wars The Force Awakens Incredible Cross-Sections

For fans, this book is sure to be the sort of intricate dose of artwork that will satisfy their thirst for all things Star Wars. However the slim volume might feel slightly lacking for those looking for more of an artistic insight.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tom May is a freelance writer and editor specialising in design and technology. He was previously associate editor at Creative Bloq and deputy editor at net magazine, the world’s best-selling magazine for web designers. Over two decades in journalism he’s worked for a wide range of mainstream titles including The Sun, Radio Times, NME, Heat, Company and Bella. Follow him on Twitter @tom_may.

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