Unique timepiece will change how you see your day

This 24-hour timepiece uses a numberless design and a colourful spectrum to organise the day.


Get a better balance of time with Today

Do you ever feel like there's not enough hours in the day to fit everything in? Maybe it's time to change how you see your day. That's exactly what designer Scott Thrift has done with Today, a timepiece with an experimental design that relies on imagery instead of numbers. The result being a clock that aims to make you feel like you have more time.

Instead of marking off the minutes and hours, Today uses a 24-hour movement which travels at half the speed of a regular clock. Its single hand completes one full rotation every day. Thrift says it helps to regulate sleep patterns and tap into the idea that each day is a gift.


Today has a single hand that moves at half the speed of a regular clock

"I've lived with a prototype of Today now for a year and it has been a transformative experience. The day has become wider and more fulfilling," says Thrift. "Living with Today makes so much sense and feels so right that it's become a foregone conclusion to make it available to the world."


A slower speed makes it feel like you have more time

The background of the Today clock is painted to reflect the lighting at different points of the day. During daytime the hand will sail through a soothing sky blue, while at night it will travel over a purple backdrop.


The colour of Today was inspired by the view from a plane at 30,000 ft

With Today smashing its fundraising goal on Kickstarter, it appears that this creative approach to time is striking a nerve with a lot of people.

"In the past 200 years nearly everything has changed except the way that we tell time," reasons Thrift. "We are long overdue for ways of relating to time that are a lot less like a computer and a lot more human."


Dom Carter is staff writer at Creative Bloq. Coming from an SEO and web copywriting background, Dom first came to Future for a week of work experience at SFX magazine. Away from the office, Dom likes to write scripts and short stories, and watch an unhealthy amount of Doctor Who.