What's your type: workshop explores the personalities of typefaces

Typography is demystified in one-hour workshops that use games to reveal font personalities.

To the layman, the world of typography can seem like an intimidating place. With thousands of different forms to choose from, ranging from retro fonts to cursive fonts, each with their own uses and associations, choosing the right one is an art form in itself.

In an effort to make typography more fun and accessible, the London Design Festival is hosting an event called What's Your Type? , featuring a number of workshops that use games and research data to demystify different type sets, as well as teaching people about their uses.

Discover the different personalities behind everyday fonts

The one-hour sessions involve experiments and demonstrations that explore the different personalities of fonts. Complete with a Font Selfie machine, visitors can generate their own type personality analysis.

Attendees can also take part in Type Tasting surveys. These involve compiling 'tasting notes' that you can take away and use in the future to help inform your own typography-based projects.

See how brands use different fonts to convey a message

The workshops are based around hard data rather than relying on the opinions of designers, so you'll soon be able to recognise what factors make a font look cheap, expensive, glam, or angry, This should prove to be useful for students down the line when it comes to reasoning their creative decisions to difficult clients.

Grab take away notes to help you with future font decisions

If you're interested in attending, there are five sessions waiting to be booked on 21 September, with tickets costing £15. Situated in Bedales Borough Market in London, the workshops will equip designers and the typographically curious with the necessary skills to choose and understand different fonts.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dom Carter is Creative Bloq's staff writer, news finder, and all round design fan. You'll usually find him drooling over screen prints and coveting more notebooks than is practical.

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