GrandArmy delivers patriotic redesign for US Postal Service

There's no mistaking which nation's delivery service this star-spangled branding was created for.

United States Postal Service redesign

When award-winning multidisciplinary creative agency GrandArmy was commissioned with redesigning the American institution that is the US Postal Service, they went at it with a true sense of patriotism.

The team comment on its website: "In addition to being a technical marvel, it is also a storied and hallowed institution. From the Pony Express to the first letters sent by air-mail, few things are so uniquely American.

From the Pony Express to the first letters sent by air-mail, few things are so uniquely American

"Plagued by budget woes in the modern era – the USPS sought to modernize its image, and more importantly, streamline the retail experience with clear signage, way-finding and packaging."

United States Postal Service redesign

The USPS redesign features a bold use of the Knockout font family

Total knockout

The response from GrandArmy was this strong, patriotic redesign, featuring a bold use of the Knockout font family, delivered in red, white and blue. GrandArmy's Steven Noble also developed an incredible illustration of a bald eagle to feature on the USPS shipping boxes.

However, while the majority of GrandArmy's files were used, the USPS decided to drop the studio's original concepts for its shipping boxes. Although clearly inspired by GrandArmy's designs, USPS instead changed almost every aspect, losing the eagle and opting for a much more minimal approach. Which do you prefer?

GrandArmy's original design (left) was altered by USPS (right) after the design files were delivered

United States Postal Service redesign

United States Postal Service redesign

United States Postal Service redesign

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kerrie Hughes is associate editor at Creative Bloq. Her employment at Future Publishing began in January 2010 as staff writer for 3D World magazine. Since then, she's written regularly for other publications, including ImagineFX and Computer Arts magazines.