Florian Schültke reveals the secret to good global management

Landor Hamburg's new MD is bringing an international perspective to his role at the rapidly-expanding agency.

Having hopped all over Germany to take up managerial roles at practices including TBWA (Berlin), Tequila (Düsseldorf) and Publicis Dialog (Frankfurt), Florian Schültke is now getting his teeth into his latest job - and city - as he takes up the position of managing director of Landor Hamburg.

From his new post at one of the branding consultancy's most integral global offices, and the fastest growing, Schültke is enjoying the chance to properly flex his international people skills, as we found out.

What does your new job entail?

Day to day, I'm doing everything related to the management of our company. I'm ensuring that we follow our vision and focus on generating new business for Landor. Also, I'm the 'culture officer' of our office - a responsibility I take very seriously, as the wellbeing of the team is an important driver for our success and everyone's job satisfaction.

What attracted you to the role?

I see myself as a generalist - over the course of my career I have worked with national and international clients in practically all aspects of communications. In my new role at Landor Hamburg, I can utilise my background and experience to focus on their most logical application: the core of the brand.

Have there been any unexpected perks?

The team at Landor Hamburg is incredibly international. We have people of 25 different nationalities working in our office. It's pretty special - even for an outward-looking metropolis like Hamburg. I find that fascinating. It's great to get inspired by all these different cultures and mentalities.

How did you get the job?

I was approached through the holding company, followed by many talks with the relevant people at all levels of management. I hesitated at first, but they won me over!

Your new role has an international slant - what's the key to successful international management?

A common culture and vision are the key drivers to success. You need to be aware of your roots, but also be able to leverage and bring together the strengths and individual prowess of the different offices worldwide, for seamless cooperation. This requires people who have experience in working internationally - and with my international background, I'm trying my best to make a valuable contribution. However, you need to also recognise cultural differences, and sometimes adapt your way of working.

What advice would you give to someone hoping to follow a similar career path?

You need to be fascinated with and focused on everything that's fresh and new, be keen on personal development and trust in yourself. Be a little bit crazy and seize opportunities.

This article originally appeared in Computer Arts issue 225.