Skip to main content

Add sketching to your design workflow

With computerised workflows being the default way of approaching design today, it's easy to underestimate just how useful sketching can be in the design process. Obviously it's a great way to quickly and easily rough out ideas and prototypes, but sketching can be a much more effective and versatile tool than you might realise.

Sketching is a core skill and tool of any designer. It is a quick and cheap way to ideate, develop and iterate on possible design solutions, both alone and with a group. To find out just how effective it can be, come to Generate London (opens in new tab) on 21 September for a sketching workshop with Eva-Lotta Lamm (opens in new tab).

Eva-Lotta is hosting both a sketching workshop and session at Generate London

Eva-Lotta is hosting both a sketching workshop and session at Generate London
(opens in new tab)

Eva-Lotta is a UX designer and illustrator with over 12 years of experience working on digital products as an in-house designer for Google, Skype, and Yahoo! as well as freelancing and consulting for various agencies and her own clients. She regularly takes sketchnotes at all sorts of talks and conferences and has self-published her notes in several books, and in her workshop, Sketching interfaces (opens in new tab), she'll help you add sketching to your range of tools.

Over the course of the day you'll take a closer look at when and how to use sketching in the design process, how to make your sketches communicate more clearly and efficiently, and how to run a collaborative sketching session with a group of people. 

Why take ordinary notes when you can take sketchnotes?

Why take ordinary notes when you can take sketchnotes?

You'll start with basic sketching techniques and build up the pace through a mix of theory, exercises, practice sessions and group critiques; you'll learn how to sketch detailed screen designs, interactions and transitions, how to label and annotate your sketches, and decide on the right level of fidelity for the project you're working on.

The all-day workshop is ideal for designers, developers, product managers or anyone who is involved in creating websites or applications and wants to learn sketching skills. All skill levels are welcome and no previous sketching skills or knowledge are necessary.

Eva-Lotta Lamm has been doing sketchnotes for years...

Eva-Lotta Lamm has been doing sketchnotes for years...

And if you can't make the workshop – or would rather attend one of the day's other workshops hosted by Brendan Dawes, Brad Weaver and Micah Godbolt – Eva-Lotta will also be speaking about sketching at the main Generate Conference.

In Kickstart your sketching skills (opens in new tab) she'll show you some basic techniques to start sketching out your ideas, and share her thoughts on practising and playing to develop your skills. If you think you're rubbish at sketching then it'll be a great way to get into using a pen and paper; with plenty of hands-on practice on how to sketch simple objects, people, faces and emotions.

She's even turned them into a book and posters

She's even turned them into a book and posters
(opens in new tab)

To find out more about Eva-Lotta's workshop and talk, as well as all the other workshops and sessions on offer over three days at the Royal Institution, head for the Generate London (opens in new tab) site and book your tickets now (opens in new tab)!

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Jim McCauley is a writer, performer and cat-wrangler who started writing professionally way back in 1995 on PC Format magazine, and has been covering technology-related subjects ever since, whether it's hardware, software or videogames. A chance call in 2005 led to Jim taking charge of Computer Arts' website and developing an interest in the world of graphic design, and eventually led to a move over to the freshly-launched Creative Bloq in 2012. Jim now works as a freelance writer for sites including Creative Bloq, T3 and PetsRadar, specialising in design, technology, wellness and cats, while doing the occasional pantomime and street performance in Bath and designing posters for a local drama group on the side.