DaVinci Resolve vs Adobe Premiere Pro vs Adobe Premiere Elements

DaVinci Resolve vs Adobe Premiere Pro vs Adobe Premiere Rush
(Image credit: DaVinci Resolve, Adobe)

If you want to build up your editing skills while creating impressive videos, whether that’s short films, YouTube shows, or company advertisements, you’ll need some decent software.

Adobe Premiere Pro has long been the number-one choice of many professional video editors. A scaled-down version of it, Adobe Premiere Elements, is aimed at those less confident with their editing skills. DaVinci Resolve, developed by Blackmagic Design, is an increasingly popular all-in-one post-production program.

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1. Premiere Pro: the best video editing software overall
Aimed at professional editors, Adobe's Premiere Pro is the industry standard tool. If you're not sure about whether you want to subscribe, you can get a seven-day free trial.

2. Adobe Premiere Elements: the best option for beginners

2. Adobe Premiere Elements: the best option for beginners
If you're new to video editing, we'd recommend you start with Adobe Premiere Elements, a simplified version that's also cheaper (and there's a 30-day free trial, too).

3. DaVinci Resolve: free video editing software

3. DaVinci Resolve: free video editing software
The standard version of DaVinci Resolve is completely free, and includes some impressive features, including some excellent colour grading tools. 

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Kieron Moore

Kieron Moore is a freelance writer based in Manchester, England. He contributes to Future sites including TechRadar and Creative Bloq, focusing on subjects including creative software, video editing, and streaming services. This work draws on his experience as an independent filmmaker and an independent TV watcher. He can be found on Twitter at @KieronMoore, usually when he’s meant to be writing.