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Paper-cut Star Wars scenes are a Han-crafted delight

Star Wars kirigami

Hagan-Guirey transforms paper into 3D Star Wars sets armed with only a scalpel

May the Fourth be with you! To celebrate this momentous day, have a look at these stunning kirigami Star Wars scenes from artist Marc Hagan-Guirey, aka Paper Dandy (opens in new tab). Kirigami is a form of paper craft that sees the artist take a sheet of paper and, armed with only a scalpel, transform it into a gorgeous, 3D piece of art – or, in this case, a Star Wars set.

"I've been doing this professionally for three years now – I feel like the work has improved massively; you don't really expect to see that in your own work. Even still, every time I sit down to work out how to engineer a new piece, it's like I've completely forgotten how to do it," explains Hagan-Guirey.

Launching a Kickstarter (opens in new tab), he aims to raise enough funds to produce an exhibition in order to showcase these stunning works. "I haven't decided the final list of models," he continues. "The cases are expensive to make, that's the deciding factor. If the campaign super-exceeds the target I could well do all 20 concepts." With prints, books and the kirigami models themselves up for grabs, any Star Wars fan would be silly to miss out.

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

Star Wars kirigami

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Sammy Maine
Sammy Maine

Sammy Maine was a founding member of the Creative Bloq team, working as a Commissioning Editor. Her interests cover graphic design in music and film, illustration and animation. Since departing, Sammy has written for The Guardian, VICE, The Independent & Metro, and currently co-edits the quarterly music journal Gold Flake Paint.