Skip to main content

Early artwork for Guardians of the Galaxy revealed

Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy has proven to be this summer's big movie success. An epic, sweeping galactic adventure, ensuring the major scenes stayed on track and true to director James Gunn's vision proved a challenge for previs studio Proof (opens in new tab).

Proof worked closely with Gunn for the past year-and-a-half to previs several of the biggest action sequences. Ron Frankel, Proof's founder and creative director explains: "Guardians of the Galaxy presented us with numerous big action sequences that have really never been done before. Full CG, high-adreneline battle sequences that required a lot of choreography."

It was essential that viewers don't get lost in the action sequences and CG-heavy scenes, and every scene was developed with the audience's view in mind.

Every scene was developed with the audience's view in mind

Every scene was developed with the audience's view in mind

Another big challenge for Proof and James Gunn was bringing the two CG leads to life, Groot the talking tree and Rocket Racoon. The audience needed to forget these were CG or even unusual and embrace them on level terms with the actors.

Guardians of the Galaxy presented us with numerous big action sequences that have really never been done before

"It was very important to James that the audience forget that these two characters were CG, and, instead, accepts them as real characters - characters that actually exist in the world of the film - because they really are the heart of the movie," says Earl Hibbert, Proof's previs supervisor.

It was very important to James that the audience forget that these two characters were CG," Hibbert comments

It was very important to James that the audience forget that these two characters were CG," Hibbert comments

From a technical point of view it was important that the previs scenes worked together with the CG environments, green screen scenes and real sets. Working closely with the film's production designer Charlie Wood and visual effects supevisor Stephane Ceretti ensured the previs sets matched the dimensions of the actual build.

"In this manner," says Hibbert, "the action we designed during previs could be captured on set, while still giving James [Gunn] the flexibility to improvise new shots."

A key stage for the team was switch from previs to postvis work, again led by Hibbert. The job at hand was to create a cut of the film for James Gunn to work with that included all the CG scenes, set extensions and CG characters. In total there were 1900 VFX shots to postvis.

For more behind-the-scenes peeks at the world's top movies, check out our Audiovisual channel (opens in new tab).

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Ian Dean is Editor, Digital Arts & Design at Creative Bloq. Ian is the former editor of many leading magazines, including digital art focused ImagineFX and 3D World and leading video game title Official PlayStation Magazine. Ian launched the magazine X360 in 2005 and has relaunched many others. In his early career Ian wrote for music and film magazines, including Uncut, SFX, and assisted on The Idler. With over 25 years' experience in both print and online journalism, Ian has worked on many leading video game and digital art brands. With a passion for video games and art, Ian combines his loves to bring the latest news on NFTs, video game art and tech, and more to Creative Bloq. In his spare time he doodles in Corel Painter, ArtRage, and Rebelle while finding time to play Xbox and PS5.

Topics
3D