Skip to main content

The art of sharpening

One of the reasons for Photoshop's popularity is the huge number of third-party plug-in filters available for it. The chances are that whatever effect you want to achieve, there's a plug-in that can do it, or one is in development. The downside to this constant supply of impressive effects is that Photoshop's standard filters get overlooked, especially innocuous-looking ones like High Pass, a well-kept secret in the backwaters of the Others sub-menu.

At first sight, High Pass appears fairly mundane - all it seems to do is flatten and desaturate an image. But once you understand how it operates you'll appreciate the tool's extreme versatility. It's part of a family of filters that enables you to manipulate the different frequency ranges of information that compose an image.

Over the next few pages, we'll explain exactly how High Pass works. Using practical demonstrations, we'll look at how High Pass can be used as a more flexible alternative to Unsharp Mask for sharpening images, and as a tool for removing any distracting background patterns present in tiled textures.

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

The Creative Bloq team is made up of a group of design fans, and has changed and evolved since Creative Bloq began over a decade ago. The current website team consists of five people: Editor Kerrie Hughes, Deputy Editor Rosie Hilder, Deals Editor Beren Neale, Senior News Editor Daniel Piper, Digital Arts and Design Editor Ian Dean, and Staff Writer Amelia Bamsey. The 3D World and ImagineFX magazine teams also pitch in, ensuring that content from 3D World and ImagineFX is represented on Creative Bloq.