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The best monitors for video editing in 2022

best monitors for video editing 2021
(Image credit: BenQ)

The best monitors for video editing will significantly improve your workflow whether you’re a pro, an enthusiast, or a novice. They might even improve the quality of your work. Think about it. There’s little room for error in editing videos, especially when it comes to colour support, colour accuracy, and contrast, which means that not just any subpar monitor will do. And, if you’re using one, your work will never be top-notch.

No matter how powerful and kitted-out your video editing PC or laptop is, it won’t do you any good if your monitor doesn’t deliver the ideal picture quality you require. Professional video editors know that it takes more than the best video editing software and a powerful PC to create professional-looking videos. You need to, therefore, be very particular when choosing the video editing display that’s going to be a part of your editing setup.

Having excellent colour coverage and reproduction – to cinematic video editors, that means a minimum colour gamut of 95% DCI-P3 – as well as colour accuracy of delta E < 2 is incredibly vital. As is having higher brightness levels and a higher contrast ratio. Since a lot of content these days comes in a higher resolution, you should also consider one of the best 4K monitors. Not only will it future-proof your rig, but it will also give you a whole lot of space in which to spread out and work. HDR support might be a necessary feature for you as well, especially if you create a lot of HDR content.

Choosing an excellent video editing monitor might be tricky, especially if you’re new to the world of video editing, but you’ve got us to help. We put together a list of the best monitors for video editing below to set you on the right path. 

To fully round out your setup, check out our guide for the best headphones for video editing. If you do a lot of work in the field using an Apple laptop, you might want to consider our guide to the best MacBook for video editing, too.

The best monitors for video editing available now

Product shot of Dell Ultrasharp U3219Q, one of the best monitors for video editingCB

(Image credit: Dell)

01. Dell Ultrasharp U3219Q

The best monitor for video editing for most people

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 1 x HDMI, 1 x DisplayPort, 1 x USB-C
Brightness: 400 nits
Colour gamut: 99% sRGB, 95% DCI P3, 99% Rec.709
HDR: VESA DisplayHDR 400

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent colour accuracy
+
Great connectivity overall

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited brightness

Dell somehow finds that sweet spot between fantastic performance, valuable features, and a reasonable price tag with many of its products. And, the Dell Ultrasharp U3219Q is such a great example of that balance that it sits at the top of our buying guide. Thanks to its large, but not too large, 32-inch panel, it’s an easy display to work on as well. You get that 4K resolution to keep things sharp, the kind of colour coverage you need for video editing – specifically, 99 per cent sRGB, 95 per cent DCI-P3, and Rec. 709 colour support – and an adequate, if not mind-blowing, DisplayHDR 400.

While the HDR support could be better, and the brightness will leave the pickiest editors looking at other (and more expensive) options, it’s still a fantastic choice. Add in features like a USB hub to connect all your essential peripherals and a price that is very reasonable for creative-oriented monitors, and you end up with a display that will satisfy most video editors.

Product shot of LG 32UK550, one of the best monitors for video editingCB endorsed

(Image credit: LG)

02. LG 32UK550

The best cheap monitor for video editing

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 1 x DisplayPort, 2 x HDMI
Brightness: 300 nits
Colour gamut: 95% DCI P3
HDR: HDR10

Reasons to buy

+
4K and DCI-P3 support
+
Excellent price

Reasons to avoid

-
No frills

While most displays made with content creators and editors in mind cost double, triple, and sometimes quadruple what most general use monitors cost, the LG 32UK550 offers an excellent alternative for those on a budget. Part of that has to do with using a VA panel, which keeps costs low while still offering a reasonably satisfying viewing experience. In some ways, using a VA panel works to this monitor’s advantage since it provides a great contrast ratio and particularly strong black levels.

And, though it’s on the budget side of things, it provides quite a bit of screen real estate, thanks to its 32-inch panel and UHD resolution. As a result, working on projects is a breeze. You also get HDR support, even if it's just HDR10, 300 nits of brightness, and, most importantly, a colour coverage of 95% DCI-P3.

Some of the heavy hitters on this list might come with better specs, particularly regarding colour accuracy. And, you won’t find the increasingly crucial USB-C port or a USB hub here. But, this no-frills option is still a strong contender, especially if you don’t have a big budget. 

Product shot of MSI Prestige PS341, one of the best monitors for video editingCB endorsed

(Image credit: MSI)

03. MSI Prestige PS341WU

The best ultrawide monitor for video editing

Specifications

Screen size: 34in
Resolution: 5120 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 1 x DisplayPort, 2 x HDMI, 1 x USB-C
Brightness: 450 nits
Colour gamut: 98% DCI P3, 100% sRGB
HDR: VESA DisplayHDR 600

Reasons to buy

+
5K 21:9 panel
+
Excellent colours and good brightness

Reasons to avoid

-
Cheap-feeling build

MSI might be a big name in gaming, but that doesn’t mean the company cannot churn out a high-quality product that will satisfy content creators and video editors. The enormous and superb MSI Prestige PS341WU ultrawide monitor is ideal for creative work, from its 5K2K resolution to a feature set that lends itself perfectly to a creative workflow.

Its 5120 x 2160 resolution allows you to run and work on your 4K projects at full size while still having real-time access to all your editing tools. You don’t want to have to stop and search through all your tools every time you want to make a tweak, after all. Even productivity work becomes more seamless thanks to all that extra space. But, of course, none of that matters if the panel can’t adequately represent your work. Thankfully, its 98% DCI-P3 and 100% sRGB colour coverage, 600 nits of brightness, and DisplayHDR 600 is more than enough for you to hone in on the details of your projects. And, it comes with all the ports you could need, from USB-C, DisplayPort, and HDMI connectivity to a USB hub for a more streamlined setup.

It does suffer a little when it comes to its build quality and design compared to its rivals, but it’s still a fantastic choice, especially if you need that ultrawide panel. If you can spend the money on a panel like this, you’ll be happy with this.

Man using the Eizo ColorEdge CG319X, one of the best monitors for MacBook ProCB endorsed

(Image credit: Eizo)
The best monitor for video editing if money is no object

Specifications

Screen size: 31.1in
Resolution: 4096 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 2 x DisplayPort, 2 x HDMI
Brightness: 350 nits
Colour gamut: 99% AdobeRGB, 98% DCI P3
HDR: HLG HDR

Reasons to buy

+
Industry-standard presets
+
Remarkable colour accuracy
+
Automatic AI calibration

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely expensive

Designed for creative professionals doing pro work with no scope for errors, the Eizo ColorEdge CG319X might just be the ultimate monitor for video editing thanks to its unmatched performance and rare self-calibration feature. This is superlative display, to be sure, with a superlative price to match, which is really the only reason why it isn’t topping this list. 

If you can afford it, however, get it. Despite its uninspired design, there’s a lot that video editors will love here. Its range of broadcast and cinema presets – including Rec. 2020 and DCI-P3 with 98% colour coverage — for one make it an excellent choice for most types of creatives. We also found the colour accuracy to be top-notch during our testing, as noted in our Eizo ColorEdge CG319X review. And, the wider DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) resolution works beautifully for filmmakers shooting in this format, letting them see the original footage at 1:1 pixels no matter what format you might switch it to during editing.

Best yet, it boasts a self-calibration system built-in, with a sensor automatically checking its accuracy periodically and correcting any issues. That's without you ever lifting a finger.  This means that you'll spend less time fine-tuning the screen and more time polishing your footage.

Product shot of LG 32UN880 UltraFine Display Ergo, one of the best monitors for video editingCB endorsed

(Image credit: LG)

05. LG 32UN880 UltraFine Ergo

The most ergonomic display for video editing

Specifications

Screen size: 31.5in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 2 x HDMI, 1 x Displayport, 1 x USB-C
Brightness: 350 nits
Colour gamut: 95% DCI-P3
HDR: HDR10

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent ergonomics
+
Affordable price

Reasons to avoid

-
Sacrifices in brightness for the price

Novice and casual filmmakers and vloggers will appreciate the value the LG 32UN880 offers. It’s among the most affordable 4K monitors out there that offer 95% DCI-P3 colour coverage, HDR10 support, and brilliant picture quality, as well as a decently sized screen. It also comes with USB-C connectivity and a hub for all your video editing tools. 

However, it isn’t just for beginners. Experienced editors looking for a more versatile setup will appreciate its extremely flexible mount and stand. Its C-Clamp and One Click Mount combo not only offers a more minimalist setup but also allows the monitor to move virtually whichever way you want. It lets you extend up to 180mm, adjust the height up to 130mm, tilt up and down 25 degrees, and pivot up to 90 degrees. The arm also swivels up to 280 degrees, which comes in handy especially when you’re in a studio setup.

We only wish that it’s brighter and has better HDR support to meet the exacting demands of pro-level filmmakers. However, the LG 32UN880 certainly has its place in the video editing world.

Product shot of ViewSonic VP3268a-4K, one of the best monitors for video editing

(Image credit: ViewSonic)

06. ViewSonic VP3268a-4K

Best mid-range monitor for Rec. 709 colour space workloads

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 2 x HDMI 2.0, 1 x DisplayPort, 1 x USB-C
Brightness: 350 nits
Colour gamut: 100% Rec. 709, 100% sRGB
HDR: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Good factory calibration
+
Great productivity and content creation features

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR support

Not all video editors and colourists work in the DCI-P3 colour space. While DCI-P3 is the colour space of choice for cinematic projects, most post-production editors in the broadcast and online industries still rely on Rec. 709. If you’re one of them, you’ll find the ViewSonic VP3268a-4K is an excellent option. This isn’t a newcomer in the monitors market; rather, it’s a modern update to the ageing ViewSonic VP3268, bringing in USB-C connectivity to make it even better suited for content creators.

There’s a lot to love here, including its 100% Rec. 709 and 100% sRGB colour gamuts, UHD resolution for more screen real estate, and 350 nits of brightness. It also boasts Pantone validation and higher colour accuracy than the original model. It’s a great productivity monitor as well if you want to switch gears and send out emails, create contracts, and do some bookkeeping for your business. It costs a bit more than its direct rivals, but that mid-range price makes it affordable even for budding creatives.

Product shot of Dell UP3218K, one of the best monitors for video editing

(Image credit: Dell)

07. Dell UltraSharp 32 PremierColor UP3218K

The best 8K monitor for video editing

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 7680 x 4320
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Inputs: 2 x DisplayPort
Brightness: 400 nits
Colour gamut: 100% Adobe RGB, 100% sRGB, 98% DCI P3, 100% Rec.709
HDR: none

Reasons to buy

+
Colossal 8K resolution
+
Fantastic colour coverage

Reasons to avoid

-
So, so expensive
-
No HDMI 2.1

This is the best monitor for video editing if you're working with 8K or 6K footage and need a way to view it at full 1:1-pixel quality. We're not exactly swimming in 8K display options so far, but the Dell UltraSharp UP3218K makes sure that if you do get one, you're getting an absolutely top-tier screen in so many ways. It's about more than just the resolution – you also get 100% AdobeRGB, 100% sRGB, 100% Rec. 709, and 98% DCI-P3 colour coverage.

Connectivity is a little weaker – with no HDMI 2.1 port, the only connections for 8K support are the dual DisplayPort connectors, and there's no USB-C at all – but if you're pushing that many pixels, you're probably used to the idea that it's a bit of a hassle. And at 32 inches, it's a perfectly workable size too, despite the ridiculous number of pixels.

Product shot of the Acer ConceptD CP3271K, one of the best monitors for video editing, on a wooden desk

(Image credit: Future)
Best video editing monitor for that 27-inch 4K sweet spot

Specifications

Screen size: 27in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 144Hz
Inputs: 2 x HDMI, 2 X DisplayPort
Brightness: 400 nits
Colour gamut: 99% sRGB, 90% DCI-P3
HDR: VESA Certified DisplayHDR 400

Reasons to buy

+
Exceptionally colour-accurate
+
Very bright, with HDR capability

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor AdobeRGB coverage
-
Not USB-C

The Acer ConceptD CP3271K’s over-$1,000/£1,000 price tag may be a hard pill to swallow, even for consumers who aren’t looking for cheap options. However, as we noted in our Acer ConceptD CP3271K review, this superb piece of kit boasts a few premium features that make it worth the price for creative professionals. 

That sweet 4K resolution on a 27-inch panel spot means it’s the perfect combination of screen real estate, smaller footprint, and perfectly-sized visuals. Meanwhile, the 400 nits of brightness, 99% sRGB and 90% DCI-P3 colour gamuts, and Delta-E accuracy of less than 1 make it an excellent tool for content creators. In addition, we found its colour space coverage claims to be spot-on and its colour and brightness uniformity good, if not exactly exceptional. And, naturally, we appreciate the inclusion of the shading hood.

When it’s time to unwind after work, the 144Hz refresh rate, which is relatively new on 4K panels, ensures clean, sharp, and butter-smooth gaming. 

Product shot of Asus ProArt PA32UCG-K, one of the best monitors for video editing

(Image credit: Asus)

09. Asus ProArt PA32UCG-K

The best monitor for HDR video editing

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh rate: 120Hz
Inputs: 2 x Thunderbolt 3, 1 x DisplayPort 1.4 DSC, 1 x HDMI(v2.1), 2 x HDMI(v2.0)
Brightness: 1000cd/㎡
Colour gamut: 100%sRGB, 99.5% Adobe RGB, 98% DCI-P3, 85% Rec.2020
HDR: VESA DisplayHDR 1400

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive colour gamuts
+
1,600 cd/㎡ peak brightness

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely expensive

You don’t need to exclusively film footage in HDR to take advantage of a true HDR display, but you do need to be a proper pro to justify getting one. HDR displays aren’t the cheapest, and the Asus ProArt PA32UCG-K’s steep price tag proves this. However, if you do have deep pockets, its DisplayHDR 1400 and 1,600 nits of peak brightness will blow you away. 

Making it all the more worth your money is its Delta E < 1 colour difference and extensive colour space – apart from its 100%sRGB and 99.5% Adobe RGB, it also boasts 98% DCI-P3 and 85% Rec.2020 gamuts. The panel itself utilises smaller LEDs that offer 1152 local dimming zones for higher contrast and deep blacks. There’s plenty of input ports on hand as well, allowing you to spread out and really immerse yourself in your creative process. And, naturally, that 4K resolution takes care of displaying impeccable details.

This isn’t for novice and budget video editors, but professional designers and content creators would be wise to invest.

The Apple Pro Display XDR, one of the best monitors for video editing, in a pro video editing setup

(Image credit: Apple)
The best 6K monitor, and an HDR wizard

Specifications

Screen size: 32in
Resolution: 6016 x 3384
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Input: 1 x Thunderbolt 3, 3 x USB Type-C
Brightness: 1000 nits
Colour gamut: 100% DCI P3, 10-bit colour
HDR: XDR (Extreme Dynamic Range)

Reasons to buy

+
1,600-nit peak brightness 
+
Huge 6K resolution
+
Thunderbolt & USB-C connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Very expensive…
-
…and it doesn't come with a stand

While we haven't completed our review of Apple's 6K display, we already know it's a beast, aiming to be closer to a monitor in the pro film production sense, rather than a monitor in the 'computer screen' sense we've been using it here. It's intended to give you as close to perfect playback as you can get for the money (and, bear in mind, it's a lot of money). You've got a resolution of 6016 x 3384, which is enough for many 6K formats (though not quite the 6K full frame recording of a RED camera). Added to that is an incredible HDR peak brightness of up to 1,600 nits, with a typical brightness of 1,000 nits – and there are 576 individual dimming zones for backlight control, so contrast will be simply colossal.

In terms of colours, there are specific reference modes for DCI P3, sRGB, NTSC, BT.709, and many more. That includes a reference mode for 'Apple display', which will make it match a MacBook Pro for brightness, so you get a consistent look if you have them side by side. There's the option of a nanotexture effect on the screen to reduce reflectivity as low as it goes for monitors like this, too.

It comes with one Thunderbolt 3 port (meaning it can go at the end of a Thunderbolt chain, but can't be a Thunderbolt hub), plus three USB-C ports for connecting accessories. The downside to all this is that it's extremely expensive, and the price our widgets are pulling in here are just for the display… the official stand costs a further $999 / £949 / AU$1,699. You can also get a VESA mount adapter, if you prefer. If you're interested in having an Apple monitor, you might also want to check out Apple's latest display – see our Apple Studio Display review for more details.

Is a 4K monitor good for video editing?

Resolution isn’t everything when it comes to choosing the right monitor for video editing. But, if you’re hoping to produce content in UHD, you’ll need to be able to see your work in its native resolution. So, having a monitor capable of 4K resolution isn’t just good. For most video editors, it’s necessary. Just keep in mind that you’ll need a computer powerful enough to be able to deliver that high resolution content to a 4K monitor.

Are curved monitors good for video editing?

It’s not necessary to have a curved monitor to do great work on your video editing projects. But, curved monitors do offer a few advantages. Since they make the whole screen equidistant from your eyes, they’re easy to work with since you won’t have to strain as much to see the corners of your screen. And, many curved monitors come in a wider 21:9 aspect ratio, meaning you’ll have more screen real estate and can work on projects in their native resolution while still having instant access to your editing tools. However, you do have more limited viewing angles compared to flat displays. If you need to show your work to colleagues, they might not see an accurate representation of your project.

Is Hz important for video editing?

While refresh rate is crucial for video editing, just about every contemporary monitor comes with at least a 60Hz refresh rate. And, considering that most video is shot at 30 or 60 fps, having a faster refresh rate won’t make much of a difference. Of course, if you’re also doing animation or are hoping to game on that same display, having a speedier refresh rate becomes a bit more of a priority.

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Cat is the editor of Creative Bloq's sister site Advnture. She’s a UK Athletics qualified run leader, and in her spare time enjoys nothing more than lacing up her shoes and hitting the roads and trails (the muddier, the better)

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