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Thames & Hudson rebrand makes the old new again

Thames & Hudson catalogue
Thames & Hudson's new logo in action (Image credit: Pentagram)

Illustrated book publisher Thames & Hudson has revealed a brand new visual identity designed by Pentagram. The rebrand includes a new cartouche (a frame around a design) in which the publisher's monogram and dolphin symbol are surrounded by an oval. 

This new cartouche is both a modernisation and a nod to the publisher's heritage of over 70 years. As well as being designed to work in various sizes across digital and print, it was partly inspired by an original mosaic found in Thames & Hudson's London office (below). The mosaic features the two dolphins that represent the rivers the publisher is named after, in London (Thames) and New York (Hudson). If you haven't got an old mosaic hanging around, check out our logo design inspiration guide. 

Thames and Hudson mosaic and logo

The original mosaic (left) and the new cartouche (right) (Image credit: Thames & Hudson/Future Owns)

Pentagram isn't kidding when it says the new identity was inspired by the original mosaic. As well as informing the new cartouche, it has coloured the identity's palette of cool and warm greys. It's a nice touch of detail from the studio, and certainly fits the new ethos of bringing the publisher's heritage and digital future together:

Pentagram colour palette

Now that's what we call colour matching (Image credit: Pentagram)

Demonstrating the new mark's flexibility is its application on Thames and Hudson's sales catalogues (below). The oversized, brightly coloured design sits off-centre behind bold typography, for a strikingly contemporary look. We'll be ordering a few of these.

Thames & Hudson catalogue

Thames & Hudson's new sales catalogue design (Image credit: Pentagram)

Thames and Hudson has over 2,000 books in print, from fashion titles to children's books. It was founded in 1948 with a mission to make the world of art accessible to everyone. With an eye on both the past and future of the publisher, this is a rebrand that ought to keep most people happy. 

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