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The best keyboards for Mac in 2022

Included in this guide:

Best keyboards for Mac: The Logitech MX Keys for Mac keyboard.
(Image credit: Logitech)

The best keyboards for Macs can add more flexibility to your setup, allowing you to work more productively and more comfortably. Since bringing back the Magic Keyboard in its range of MacBooks, Apple has really upped its keyboard game. But upgrading your Mac’s keyboard with a standalone alternative can work wonders, especially if you like to prop your device up on a laptop stand (see our guide to the best laptop stands for options there). So if you're looking for one of the best keyboards for Mac, we’ve got you covered in this guide.

If you're after other top-notch peripherals, be sure to check out our general buying guides for the best keyboards and the best mice you can buy in 2021. And if you’re in the market for a new Apple laptop, we’ve got all you need to know in our round-up of the best MacBooks.

The best keyboards for Mac available now

The Logitech MX Keys for Mac keyboard.

(Image credit: Logitech)

01. Logitech MX Keys Advanced Illuminated Wireless Keyboard

The best keyboard for Mac overall

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: Yes
Multi-device?: Yes
Extra features: Adjustable backlighting with proximity sensors
Reasons to buy
+Great typing experience+Long-lasting battery+Connects to three devices
Reasons to avoid
-Only one colour option

The perfect Mac keyboard has to have a number of things: First and foremost, it must be comfortable to type on; it has to feel familiar to the way Mac users work; and it should have some handy extras.

The Logitech MX Keys for Mac has all of these. Its dished keys are superbly comfy and feel natural in everyday use. Its Mac layout and space grey colour fits in perfectly with your Mac gear. And its ambient light sensor only enables the backlighting when you need it, thus saving battery life. It’s everything you need in a Mac keyboard, brilliantly executed.

The Satechi Bluetooth Wireless Keyboard for Mac.

(Image credit: Satechi)

02. Satechi Bluetooth Wireless Keyboard

The best wireless keyboard for Mac

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: Yes
Multi-device?: Yes
Reasons to buy
+Solid build quality+Works with three devices+Looks beautiful
Reasons to avoid
-Lacks standout extras

On first look, you’d be forgiven for thinking Satechi’s Bluetooth Wireless Keyboard was made by Apple. It comes in two colours (space grey and silver), both of which match Apple’s aesthetics perfectly. That means whichever you go for, it’ll fit in seamlessly with your other Apple devices.

But it’s not just about looks. This keyboard can wirelessly connect to three devices at once, with a quick key press switching between them. It has all the important function keys, plus several for common tasks like copying and pasting. And its rechargeable battery lasts up to 80 hours, so you’re never worrying about it draining too quickly.

The Keychron K8 wireless tenkeyless keyboard.

(Image credit: Keychron)

03. Keychron K8

The best keyboard for MacBook Pro

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: No
Multi-device?: Yes
Extra features: Mechanical keys, switch between macOS and Windows layouts, different key switch options
Reasons to buy
+Very comfortable to type on+Clever Mac/Windows switch+Compact size
Reasons to avoid
-Mechanical keys not for everyone

Apple has done a good job of improving its MacBook Pro keyboards in recent years, but if you have a model with the divisive butterfly keyboard, you might want an alternative to type on. Even if you have a Magic Keyboard-equipped MacBook, a more tactile option could be in order.

If that sounds familiar, the Keychron K8 will be right up your street. It’s a mechanical keyboard with plenty of key travel, which makes for a very satisfying typing experience. It’s compact and portable, and can switch between three devices. You can even change between macOS and Windows layouts for if you also use a PC.

The Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID

(Image credit: Apple)

04. Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID

The best keyboard for Mac mini

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: No
Multi-device?: No
Extra features: Touch ID button
Reasons to buy
+Brings Touch ID to the Mac mini+Very comfortable keys+Easily portable
Reasons to avoid
-Expensive compared to rivals

The Mac mini is a fantastic performer (and a great bargain). But it doesn’t come with a keyboard, which means you’ll need to kit yourself out with something good. Apple’s Magic Keyboard with Touch ID is just the ticket.

You get Apple’s excellent typing experience, and it looks sleek and slim on your desk. But the real appeal lies in the Touch ID button. While all modern MacBooks have Touch ID for logging in and verifying purchases, most standalone keyboards lack it, which means the Mac mini has been deprived – but not any longer. Just note you’ll need an Apple Silicon Mac mini for Touch ID to work.

The Logitech Craft keyboard for Mac.

(Image credit: Logitech)

05. Logitech Craft

The best keyboard for creative Mac users

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: Yes
Multi-device?: Yes
Extra features: Shortcut wheel, adjustable backlighting with proximity sensors
Reasons to buy
+Handy shortcut wheel+Good quality keys
Reasons to avoid
-Expensive compared to other keyboards-MX Keys offers similar features cheaper

Much like the MX Keys, the Logitech MX Craft is a full-size keyboard with satisfying key travel and a Mac-friendly space grey look. But it offers something that the MX Keys lacks: A clever, customisable control wheel.

This wheel performs different tasks depending on the app you’re using. Turn it in Photoshop and you can adjust brightness. In Illustrator it tweaks stroke weight. And in Microsoft Excel it can be used to instantly create charts. If you find yourself performing the same tasks in your apps and want a quicker way to perform them, this keyboard could be a real time saver.

The Logitech Ergo K860 ergonomic keyboard for Mac.

(Image credit: Logitech)

06. Logitech Ergo K860

The best ergonomic keyboard for Mac

Specifications
Wireless?: Yes
Full size?: Yes
Multi-device?: Yes
Extra features: Ergonomic split layout, raised profile, built-in wrist rest
Reasons to buy
+Great for your posture+Lots of ergonomic features
Reasons to avoid
-Quite bulky-Takes some getting used to

Typing all day can lead to wrist pain if you’re not set up correctly. To alleviate (or prevent) that discomfort, the Logitech Ergo K860 could be just what you need. It’s an ergonomic board that splits the left and right sides of the keyboard while raising its profile in the middle. The result is a much more comfortable and natural typing position that will help improve your posture.

It also comes with a built-in wrist rest and a comfortable, high-quality typing feel. Pair it with Logitech’s MX Ergo or MX Vertical from our best mouse for MacBook round-up and you will notice the difference right away.

The SteelSeries Apex Pro gaming keyboard.

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

07. SteelSeries Apex Pro

The best keyboard for Mac gaming

Specifications
Wireless?: No
Full size?: Yes
Multi-device?: No
Extra features: Adjustable mechanical keys, OLED display, magnetic wrist rest
Reasons to buy
+Adjustable key sensitivity+Built-in OLED display
Reasons to avoid
-Not wireless-Very expensive for a keyboard

These days, Mac gaming is not as rare as it used to be thanks to the improved gaming performance of Apple’s computers and better support from developers. If you enjoy playing games on your Mac, a suitable keyboard can make a real difference.

The SteelSeries Apex Pro is one of our favourites. It’s a mechanical keyboard (ideal for gamers and typists alike) with a blazing fast actuation point of 0.4mm – perfect for fast-paced games. There’s a built-in display for changing settings and profiles, the keys are rated for a whopping 100 million presses, and you can even adjust their sensitivity on the fly.

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Alex Blake

Alex Blake is a freelance tech journalist who writes for Creative Bloq, TechRadar, Digital Trends, and others. Before going freelance he was commissioning editor at MacFormat magazine, focusing on the world of Apple products. His interests include web design, typography, and video games.