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Disney's Star Wars 'detonator' bottles not allowed to fly

A trip to Disney's all-new land, Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge – which opened at Hollywood Studios yesterday – wouldn't be complete without a souvenir. But visitors hoping to remember their visit with certain Star Wars-themed Coca-Cola bottles might want to think twice before boarding their flight home. That's because the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has said they won't be allowed on flights.

It's all to do with the look of the bottles. We've already seen some standout packaging designs on Creative Bloq, but these Coca-Cola, Diet Coke, and Sprite bottles have attracted the wrong sort of attention because they bear a resemblance to thermal detonators from the Star Wars films. 

Thermal detonators are basically space-age grenades. So it's not a huge surprise that the TSA is being extra cautious and saying that the bottles "aren't allowed" on flights. The issue was raised on Twitter, when a user asked the TSA if they could pack them in their luggage.

According to CNN, a TSA representative shed more light on the situation by saying: "these items could reasonably be seen by some as replica hand grenades... While we continue to review this issue, TSA officers will maintain the discretion to prohibit any item through the screening checkpoint if they believe it poses a security threat."

The important word in that statement is "discretion". Some users have said that they had "zero issues" taking their bottles with them on a flight. But it's probably best for travellers to play it safe and enjoy their Star Wars Coke experience safe within the Star Wars galaxy. 

There's no denying the bottles look, well, edgy. Earlier this year, Scott Trowbridge, the lead Imagineer on the Galaxy's Edge project enthused about the bottles, saying they were "cool, kind of thermal detonator-ish" during a panel.

The bottles are available for $5.49 from Star Wars lands in both Disneyland and Hollywood Studios, Walt Disney World (which recently revealed its 50th anniversary logo).

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