Review: Human Figure Drawing

This guide to drawing human anatomy is less about strict adherence to rules and more about learning from your mistakes.

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Our Verdict

Relaxed and encouraging with impeccable credentials, this is the perfect book to get help you pick up a pencil and start scribbling.

For

  • Comprehensive and well-structured
  • Plenty of examples and exercises

There are a number of ways you can learn how to draw human figures. Some books give you strict rules to learn, but this is not one of them. It takes the view that learning to draw anatomy is like starting to talk or to play an instrument. 

So rather than spend too much time on theory, Daniela Brambilla instead sets a series of exercises and encourages you to learn by doing – while learning from your mistakes.

This large-format, 260-page hardback covers almost every area of human figure drawing. It begins with the basics: gestures, contours and understanding position, proportions and lines of force. Then it's on to more advanced topics such as expanding your imagination and capturing "the movements of the soul", as Brambilla rather evocatively puts it. 

There is a section to help you understand proportion and gestures

With plenty of examples, and exercises that encourage you to get scribbling, it feels like a relaxed evening class held by the best teacher in town.

This article originally appeared in ImagineFX issue 143; buy it here.

The Verdict

10

out of 10

Review: Human Figure Drawing

Relaxed and encouraging with impeccable credentials, this is the perfect book to get help you pick up a pencil and start scribbling.