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Visual identity for Ikea is a vivid delight

Ikea visual identity

This new visual identity is designed to show IKEAs playful side

There are rules to successful branding (opens in new tab) with iconic brands (opens in new tab) using a mix of logo design, typography and colour to showcase the ethos and attitudes of the company. Norwich based design student Joe Ling (opens in new tab) was tasked with recreating the visual identity of an iconic brand, choosing Swedish furniture giant IKEA.

"The identity is designed to show IKEA's playful, contemporary, and colourful side, and also to represent the idea of self assembly, which is associated with IKEA's furniture," Ling explains. "The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA's furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives."

"The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colours (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about." So, do you think it's better than the original branding IKEA are currently using?

ikea visual identity

ikea visual identity

ikea visual identity

ikea visual identity

ikea visual identity

ikea visual identity

See more examples of Joe Ling (opens in new tab)'s work over on Behance.

What do you think of this visual identity? Let us know in the comments box below!

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Sammy Maine
Sammy Maine

Sammy Maine was a founding member of the Creative Bloq team, working as a Commissioning Editor. Her interests cover graphic design in music and film, illustration and animation. Since departing, Sammy has written for The Guardian, VICE, The Independent & Metro, and currently co-edits the quarterly music journal Gold Flake Paint.