The best Glowforge machines in 2022

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of a woman looking at a laser cutting machine
(Image credit: Glowforge)

The best Glowforge machines enable you to cut and engrave hundreds materials from fabrics to wood and plastics using a powerful and accurate laser. Unlike older laser cutters that can be large, ugly and messy Glowforge 3D laser cutters are elegantly designed complete systems that are ideal for crafters and studios alike.

Glowforge Plus has already made it into our guide to the best laser cutters, but in this guide I'll take you through all three of the best Glowforge machines – the Glowforge Pro, Glowforge Plus and Glowforge Basic – as well as explaining what you can make with a Glowforge, I'll detail the Glowforge app and answer the all-important question, is a Glowforge worth it?

Glowforge follows in the footsteps of the best Cricut machines and best Silhouette machines that have managed to redesign technology usually found in large studios or factories and reinvent them for home and small studio use. The best Glowforge machines are clean and sophisticated devices that can fit snuggly into a home or boutique studio.

If you want to get an idea of what a Glowforge can do, read my Glowforge tutorial for engraving digital art onto wood.

I'll begin with an overview of each Glowforge machine, then move on to describe in detail what Glowforge machines are, including looking at the design of these laser printers and what these devices can do. Finally, I'll cover the many frequently asked questions.

The best Glowforge machines: which is best for you?

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of the Glowforge Pro

(Image credit: Glowforge)
The best Glowforge machine overall

Specifications

Machine dimensions: 38 x 20.75 x 8.25 inches
Material size: 19.5-inches wide - unlimited depth
Material height: 2 inches
Cutting area: 11 x 19.5 inches
Laser: 45 watt Class 4 laser
Warranty: 12 months
Precision: 1/1000th of an inch
Cameras: Dual: wide angle & macro

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly powerful and versatile
+
Smart and clean design
+
Class 4 laser
+
Pro cooling system

Reasons to avoid

-
Proofgrade materials are expensive

The Glowforge Pro is the brand's high-spec, top-end laser printer and is ideal for boutique studios, professional crafters and homeowners looking for a machine to help with projects around the house.

This model features upgraded materials over the Glowforge Basic, for example, which means it will handle larger, more demanding designs. It also has an upgraded cooling system so the Pro can run all day. This build-quality is reflected in the extended warranty.

While the Glowforge Pro is the same size as the Plus and Basic, 38 x 20.75 x 8.25 inches, it can handle larger projects because of its bespoke Pro Passthrough slot – essentially a slim opening that enables you to feed lengths of materials through the machine.

In my Glowforge Pro review I found this model's powerful laser (a Class 4, 45 watt laser) and improved motor makes this faster than the other two Glowforge models; it's said to be three times faster than the Glowforge Basic and two times faster than the Glowforge Plus, with cutting speeds that are 120 percent faster.

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of the Glowforge Plus laser printer

(Image credit: Glowforge)

02. Glowforge Plus

The best Glowforge machine for pro crafters.

Specifications

Machine dimensions: 38 x 20.75 x 8.25 inches
Material size: 20 x 18 inches
Material height: 2 inches
Cutting area: 11 x 19.5 inches
Laser: 40 watt Class 1 laser
Warranty: 12 months
Precision: 1/1000th of an inch, autofocus
Cameras: Dual: wide angle & macro

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile and easy to use
+
Same simple and clean design
+
Upgraded components over Basic

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller material size than Pro

The Glowforge Plus is the brand's medium-grade machine that builds on the Basic model with improved components, which makes it two-time faster than the entry-level model but lags behind the Pro edition. Like the Pro, the Plus comes with a 12 month warranty.

Aside from this, the Glowforge Plus lacks the Class 4 laser of the Pro, as it features the same Class 1 laser as the Basic. It also doesn't feature the Pro Passthrough slot meaning your material lengths are restricted to 18-inches.

However, the Plus is just as beautifully designed and curated to enable newcomers to laser engrave and cut various materials (the more powerful Pro needs a little training to use). The Plus features the same camera setup that scans materials placed in the machine and sent to the app for easy positioning.

The balance of build-quality and ease of use makes the Glowforge Plus a good laser cutter for anyone who wants to cut and engrave quickly, frequently and with few hassles. It's an excellent semi-professional crafters machine for anyone wanting to get their home crafting business up and running.

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of the Glowforge Basic with its lid open

(Image credit: Glowforge)

03. Glowforge Basic

The best Glowforge machine for hobbyists

Specifications

Machine dimensions: 38 x 20.75 x 8.25 inches
Material size: 20 x 18 inches
Material height: 2 inches
Cutting area: 11 x 19.5 inches
Laser: 40 watt, Class 1 laser
Warranty: 6 months
Precision: 1/1000th of an inch, autofocus
Cameras: Dual: wide angle & macro

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to use and manage
+
Same smart look
+
Slower than Pro and Plus

Reasons to avoid

-
A little large for a hobby machine

The Glowforge Basic is slower than both the Plus and Pro, and features the brand's basic components, so there's a six month warranty rather than 12 months. However, don't let the 'Basic' name overshadow what is still a leading laser printer.

This Basic model shares the same design notes and accessibility with its more expensive cousins; the same clean look and simple use – load material, let the camera adjust and manage the design in-app, and then press the large 'print' button. It's this approachable design to what remains a complex operation that impresses across all three Glowforge laser printers, and it's heartening to see there are no corners cut in the Basic model when it comes into use.

Of course, the Glowforge Basic remains slower, has a Class 1 laser like the Plus but not the Class 4 laser of the Pro, and like the Plus the Basic also lacks the Pro Passthrough slot for larger projects. If you're using a laser cutter occasionally, primarily for hobbies and family gifts, then the Glowforge Basic is a nice option.

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of the Glowforge Air Filter

(Image credit: Glowforge)

04. Glowforge Air Filter

The best Glowforge machine for regular users

Specifications

Machine dimensions: 16.1 x 10.2 x 16.9 inches
Warranty: 6 months

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to use and manage
+
Same smart look
+
Slower than Pro and Plus

Reasons to avoid

-
A little large for a hobby machine

The Glowforge Air Filter can remove any mess and debris with ease. Glowforge machines come with an extractor pipe that can be hung from a window to disperse any debris from your 3D printing. If you're investing in a Glowforge for a home studio, small studio or plan to use it regularly, and particularly if you're buying a Glowforge Pro, the you'll need a Glowforge Air Filter.

This expert air filtration system cleans the air from inside the Glowforge and sucks it into a recycle bin and uses HEPA (high-efficiency particulate absorbing filter) and advanced carbon technology to ensure air is clean and healthy. 

Glowforge states its Air Filter removes 99.9% of particles in the air. Its small-ish size means you can sit the Glowforge Air Filter under a craft table or workbench. It's easily setup in minutes and takes little maintenance. 

The best Glowforge machines: design and use

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of a man pulling engraved wood from a laser printer

Glowforge machines are designed to fit into a home as much as a studio, and they're easy to use (Image credit: Glowforge)

Glowforge joins the likes of Cricut and Brother's ScanNCut in bringing high-end, studio-ready technology to the home and boutique crafter. In the case of Glowforge case the dust, mess and complexity of printing, cutting and engraving using a powerful laser has been removed from the equation – these machines are clean and easy to use.

The design of a Glowforge keeps everything housed inside its glass-topped and curved box. These machines are large, and each one, no matter the model is the same size – 38 x 20.75 x 8.25 inches. An extractor pipe removes any debris, smoke and dust from your engraving and cutting, or you can hook up a Glowforge Air Filter to suck away any mess.

While powerful (The Pro has a 45 watt Class 4 laser while the Plus and Basic use a 40 watt Class 1 laser) and fast, Glowforge is simple to set up and use. The machine is ready to run in minutes, though the Pro will need a little testing before you get stuck into a project as its laser is very powerful.

The best glowforge machines; a photo of the Glowforge app

The Glowforge app can be used to design, import designs, setup and run cutting and engraving (Image credit: Glowforge)

Part of the machine's success is down to its Glowforge Print app, and it runs on Mac, PC, and Android as well as iPhone, tablet and Chromebook. The app supports most software, for example you can drag and drop files from Photoshop, Illustrator, Inkscape and even Powerpoint. 

Once a design is loaded, you simply insert the material into the Glowforge's compartment, close the glass lid and adjust the material using the cameras to align with the app's template, and press 'Print'. If you're using Proofgrade Materials that come with QR codes then Glowforge will adjust automatically to precisely cut and engrave.

There are different ways to get started with a Glowforge too. Let's take a look at the easiest ways to start laser printing:

  • Glowforge Catalogue: Make use of thousands of pre-made designs tailored to Glowforge; these are ready to print, they can be adjusted and redesigned, and are easy to assemble and can also be sold under commercial licence. These include '5 minute prints' for quick projects.
  • Use design software: As mentioned, you can create designs in the best design software, such as Photoshop and CorelDRAW. These designs can be dragged and dropped into the app, and then printed.
  • Draw or snap it: You can even simply sketch a design on paper or on a a material, or take a photo of a design, and send it to your Glowforge to cut and engrave.

The best Glowforge machines: what can you do?

So, what can Glowforge do? When looking for Glowforge ideas and to discover what can be done with one of the best Glowforge machines it's good to take a look at the brand's website. This is a community focused company and encourages users to post their Glowforge projects onto the Glowforge website (opens in new tab).

A Glowforge can cut and engrave over 100 materials, including metal, wood and fabric. It can even engrave and cut food – yes, really. This means it can be used for the kinds of projects you may use a blade cutter, such as sewing and papercraft, but it can also be used to create jewellery, leather goods, home improvements and even costumes for plays or cosplay. 

Below are some of the best Glowforge projects I've found, and these are sure to spark some creativity in your inner-crafter.

1. A leather duffle bag by Tim Ung

(Image: © Tim Ung / Glowforge)

Creator Tim Ung made this impressive high-quality leather duffle bag on his Glowforge Basic, which meant he was restricted by the dimensions of the laser printer,  roughly 11 x 19.5 inches. He based the design on a old favourite bag and used the laser cutter to create each panel before stitching together. You can read Ung's full account of this project on the Glowforge site's Gallery page (opens in new tab). Other leather projects to make on a Glowforge can include book covers, wallets and halloween masks.

2. A wooden Catan boardgame

(Image: © geek2nurse / Glowforge)

Crafter geek2nurse (opens in new tab) has created a gorgeous Catan board game made from wood. The laser cutting inside the Glowforge means each tile is neatly cut and fits perfectly into the board, for a professional finish. Each tile has been etched and engraved by the Glowforge for a detailed finish. Other wooden projects can include puzzles, toys and decorative boxes.

3. Acrylic edge-lit votive lights

(Image: © cynd11 / Glowforge)

You can use pre-made designs in the Glowforge app or buy vector files from other creatives. Users of Glowforge will often tweak files in Illustrator and Photoshop to get the right look, as cynd11 (opens in new tab) did for these acrylic lights with wooden bases. Acrylic is proving a popular material for Glowforge creators, with decorations, home renovations and gifts all being made on the laser printer.

The best Glowforge machines: Glowforge materials

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of a retro arcade cabinet made using a laser cutter

You can make almost anything on a Glowforge and Proofgrade Materials are coded to work with the laser cutter (Image credit: Glowforge)

As we've seen above, Glowforge machines can handle most materials, from leather to wood and metal, as well as card, paper and fabric. Glowforge has its own brand of materials called Proofgrade Materials, these are sources, prepared and tested to work best with Glowforge to guarantee perfect results when being cut with a laser.

These Proofgrade Materials (opens in new tab) include, leather, acrylic, hardwood and plywood. If you buy a design from the Glowforge store to make yourself the plan will come complete with a list of materials you'll need, and you can buy these along with the design. For example, to make the retro arcade desktop cabinet (pictured) would cost around $40 / £35 in materials. 

While Glowforge can handle many materials they are divided into two categories, cutting and engraving:

  • Engraving: Glass, coated metal, marble, anodised aluminium, titanium, some phones, tablets, and laptops, and more.
  • Cutting: wood, fabric, leather, paper, Plexiglas (acrylic), Delrin (acetal), mylar, rubber, Corian, foods, and more.

It's worth noting if you sign up to Glowforge Premium you get discounts and many designs are free to use. These even include commercial licences for many designs and plans.

You can use any materials with Glowforge, including hardwoods, acrylics, paper and cardboard, and you don't need to use Proofgrade Materials. But the manufacturer does stress to do your research as some plywoods will have glues and some plastics could damage the Glowforge.

Glowforge machines include $150 / £100 worth of materials when you order from Hobbycraft (opens in new tab) or directly from Glowforge (opens in new tab).

The best Glowforge machines: frequent questions

The best Glowforge machines; a photo of a laser cutting into metal

Engraving works brilliantly on a Glowforge machine. These can handle most materials, including marble (Image credit: Glowforge)

Is Glowforge Pro worth the money?

If you're a hobbyist, small studio or crafting looking to sell professional level products on your own store or Etsy then the $7,000 / £6,000 for the Glowforge Pro can be seen as a good investment. This is an industrial laser cutter for the home, and it will run and run.

How much does a Glowforge cost?

There are three models, the Glowforge Pro, Glowforge Plus and Glowforge Basic. While they are all the same size and work in the same way, there are differences.

Glowforge Pro: This is a $7,000 / £6,000, has a 45 watt Class 4 laser and upgraded components such as a specialised cooling system for extended use. It comes with a 12 month warranty. It offers the Pro Passthrough slot for large materials.

Glowforge Plus: This model is $4,995 / £2,995 and features the same upgraded components but a less powerful laser, a 40 watt Class 1 laser, so it's a little slower, and lacks the Pro Passthrough slot.

Glowforge Basic: This model is $3,995 / £2,995 and features the same 40 watt Class 1 laser as the Plus but lacks the upgraded parts. This one has a six month warranty.

Can I make money with Glowforge?

Is Glowforge like Cricut?

Glowforge shares a similar design philosophy to Cricut, in that the brand aims to bring professional quality crafting to the home, hobbyists and boutique studios. However, while Cricut uses blades to cut, Glowforge uses a laser for faster and more accurate cutting, engraving and scoring. Glowforge. Also, Glowforge can do everything out-of-the-box.  

What is Glowforge used for ?

Glowforge machines are laser printers that can cut and engrave 100s of materials, including paper, card, wood, metal and plastics. You can make everything from jewellery to toys and even furniture.

What thickness of wood can Glowforge cut?

This depends on whether you're cutting or engraving. If cutting then Glowforge will easily trim through 1/4 inch wood on a single pass, if you're cutting 1/2 inch wood thickness it may require more passes under the laser. If you're engraving them the Glowforge can handle 2-inch thick materials.

How long will a Glowforge last?

It's worth noting Glowforge machines come with 12 and six month warranties. After that it's reasonable to say a Glowforge will last years, and it's expected that under intense daily use the laser will last around two-to-three years. A replacement will cost around $500 / £400.

Is Glowforge hard to understand?

No, Glowforge is very easy to understand and master. You can be up and running with a Glowforge in around 30 minutes, the app is easy to understand, pre-made designs list the materials needed, for example, and the in-app interface enables you to drag and drop projects. The focus on ease of use, the machine has one button, means you can pay attention to your designs.

Read more:

Ian Dean is Digital Arts & Design Editor at Creative Bloq, and the former editor of many leading magazines. These titles included ImagineFX, 3D World and leading video game title Official PlayStation Magazine. In his early career he wrote for music and film magazines including Uncut and SFX. Ian launched Xbox magazine X360 and edited PlayStation World. For Creative Bloq, Ian combines his love to bring the latest news on NFTs, video game art and tech, and more to Creative Bloq, and in his spare time he doodles in Corel Painter, ArtRage, and Rebelle while finding time to play Xbox and PS5.