Digital Painting with Krita 2.9

REVIEW: With interest mounting in the free painting tool, there's now a book to show you how to use it.

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Our Verdict

An accessible and detailed guide to one of the most exciting free painting tools around; if you use Krita then don't miss it.

For

  • Packed with illustrations and examples
  • Easy to follow
  • Colourful and engaging
  • Basic to advanced techniques covered

Krita's an open-source painting tool designed for illustrators and concept artists, and a perfect free alternative to Photoshop CC. 2015 was a big year for this free graphic design software, with a crowdfunding campaign helping to fund key improvements including performance boosts and animation support. 

Since then, the software's growth has spiked, and so the timing of Digital Painting With Krita 2.9 couldn't be better. It's essentially a 226-page instruction manual for the latest version of Krita. But unlike most software manuals, both the layout and writing style are anything but boring. This colourful guide is packed with illustrations from the author and contributing artists, making it a delight to peruse and learn from.

Scott Petrovic's book is crammed with tips on getting the most out of Krita

With plenty of examples and interface screenshots helping to explain both basic and advanced features, it's also surprisingly easy to follow. And perhaps that's not surprising at all, as author Scott Petrovic has been involved in the Krita community for a long time as part of the development team, which further endorses the accuracy and reliability of the information offered by the book. 

Best of all, some of the profits from the book will go back to the Krita Foundation, so it can continue to fix bugs and add more features. 

This article originally appeared in ImagineFX issue 139; buy it here!

The Verdict

10

out of 10

Digital Painting with Krita

An accessible and detailed guide to one of the most exciting free painting tools around; if you use Krita then don't miss it.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tom May is a freelance writer and editor specialising in design and technology. He was previously associate editor at Creative Bloq and deputy editor at net magazine, the world's best-selling magazine for web designers. Over two decades in journalism he's worked for a wide range of mainstream titles including The Sun, Radio Times, NME, Heat, Company and Bella.

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