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Walmart calls out Kanye West for copycat logo

Walmart
(Image credit: Wikicommons/Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

We didn't expect to be running two Kanye West logo stories in as many weeks, but here we are. And while last week's story was a collaboration with one of the world's biggest brands (Gap, if you missed it), this week sees a conflict with another giant. Unfortunately for West, global powerhouse Walmart has taken issue with a recent patent filing from West's Yeezy brand.

The sun-shaped logo in question (below) is a collection of dots, ordered in the shape of the sun's rays. Walmart says it is far too similar to its own sun-shaped logo, and that it will create "confusion" and a "false suggestion of a connection" to Walmart's brand. Maybe West and his team needed our guide to logo design.

Walmart Yeezy

Walmart's logo (left), vs the filed Yeezy design (right) (Image credit: USPTO)

The design is described in the filing as being 'eight dotted lines, each comprising three totally shaded circles, with a total of 24 circles, arranged at equal angles as rays from a sun'. When set next to Walmart's logo above it does look incredibly similar, but Walmart's logo has only six lines, which are much thicker. Plus, there is the fact it is made of dots rather than straight lines.

This is a complicated one to unpick. While the above images do look extremely comparable, especially in overall shape, it's worth pointing out that the Walmart graphic is presented here in black lines, making it look more similar than the yellow version found on signage, for example (as below). But the black line version could be seen on printouts (like receipts or other official documents) – which could be confusing, we guess?

Walmart

Walmart's signage (Image credit: Wikimedia)

Walmart says the trouble not only lies in the actual design of the logo, but in what Yeezy will be using it for. There's a (massively) long list of use cases encompassing the retail space, including clothing and retail services, musical sound recordings and streaming, video games, hotel services and more – many of which could apparently be included in Walmart's retail domain. 

But according to Walmart, it isn't only the retail aspect that could cause confusion. The fact that the retail giant 'frequently partners with celebrities to create special lines of products and services' could provoke consumers to assume a connection when they see the logo design, complicating things further. 

We'll look forward to finding out the ruling on this case. We're pretty sure it won't be as clear as Chanel's recent disappointment over its case against Huwaei's new logo design (that was a truly bizarre one), or as Amazon's objection to this charity shop's logo – but we may be proved wrong.

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